The Route

The route we will hope to follow will see us leaving Exmouth in Western Australia and arriving in Port Louis in Mauritius. If we can manage to achieve this, we will have covered somewhere in the region of 3,600 miles of open Ocean. I say if, as the gods of the sea can be somewhat fickle at times. Mauritius is a pretty small target to aim for, and we will be influenced heavily by the weather systems that we encounter en route. Only last year a crew of four who had intended to make land at Mauritius found themselves being pushed North by a large weather system, and ended up in the Seychelles. ” Ooohh, poor them” I hear you say, “It must be terrible having to go to the Seychelles”. Now, normally we would agree with that sentiment, but what you have to understand is that this added an extra 800 miles onto their journey. You have to start questioning just how much you would be able to enjoy the idyllic Seychelles if all the way there you had been worrying if you had enough food left on board to not starve to death before you crawled ashore…….

The current system that dominates the Indian ocean will  push us in the right direction to reach Mauritius, and the prevailing winds for that time of year should also be on our side (Easterly Trade winds). However, the wind is not always aware that it should be blowing in the direction that we want it to, so we will have a weather router based back in the UK to keep an eye on what weather systems are up to and how they are likely to affect us. As our average speed will be somewhere in the region of 3 to 4 knots, we will not be able to navigate round any large meteorological events, but with constant updates, we should be able to put ourselves in the best possible positions available to us at the speeds that we will be travelling.

Another reason to pick Port Louis as our destination is that it has a large volume of container/cargo ships that pass through it, and when we have completed the challenge, we will need to find a way to transport our boat back to the UK. None of the crew have shown any real desire to row it back to the UK, so a cargo ship is the obvious choice. By reaching our intended target, we will save a lot of money on shipping costs back to the UK, and these savings mean that we will be able to give more money to the charities.

The Route

The route we will hope to follow will see us leaving Exmouth in Western Australia and arriving in Port Louis in Mauritius. If we can manage to achieve this, we will have covered somewhere in the region of 3,600 miles of open Ocean. I say if, as the gods of the sea can be somewhat fickle at times. Mauritius is a pretty small target to aim for, and we will be influenced heavily by the weather systems that we encounter en route. Only last year a crew of four who had intended to make land at Mauritius found themselves being pushed North by a large weather system, and ended up in the Seychelles. ” Ooohh, poor them” I hear you say, “It must be terrible having to go to the Seychelles”. Now, normally we would agree with that sentiment, but what you have to understand is that this added an extra 800 miles onto their journey. You have to start questioning just how much you would be able to enjoy the idyllic Seychelles if all the way there you had been worrying if you had enough food left on board to not starve to death before you crawled ashore…….

The current system that dominates the Indian ocean will  push us in the right direction to reach Mauritius, and the prevailing winds for that time of year should also be on our side (Easterly Trade winds). However, the wind is not always aware that it should be blowing in the direction that we want it to, so we will have a weather router based back in the UK to keep an eye on what weather systems are up to and how they are likely to affect us. As our average speed will be somewhere in the region of 3 to 4 knots, we will not be able to navigate round any large meteorological events, but with constant updates, we should be able to put ourselves in the best possible positions available to us at the speeds that we will be travelling.

Another reason to pick Port Louis as our destination is that it has a large volume of container/cargo ships that pass through it, and when we have completed the challenge, we will need to find a way to transport our boat back to the UK. None of the crew have shown any real desire to row it back to the UK, so a cargo ship is the obvious choice. By reaching our intended target, we will save a lot of money on shipping costs back to the UK, and these savings mean that we will be able to give more money to the charities.