1,920 Hours

of non-stop rowing

1,920 Hours

of non-stop rowing

The Indian Ocean

Only half of the crews who have attempted to cross the Indian Ocean have been successful. The quartet will start their journey in Exmouth, Western Australia and row 3,600 nautical miles in a 29-foot long ocean rowing boat, until they reach their destination in Port Louis, Mauritius. The crew will be unsupported and once they leave Western Australia they will be on their own, at the mercy of the elements and vast open ocean.

The Indian Ocean

Only half of the crews who have attempted to cross the Indian Ocean have been successful. The quartet will start their journey in Exmouth, Western Australia and row 3,600 nautical miles in a 29-foot long ocean rowing boat, until they reach their destination in Port Louis, Mauritius. The crew will be unsupported and once they leave Western Australia they will be on their own, at the mercy of the elements and vast open ocean.

Extreme Conditions

The journey is likely to be fraught with many dangers and discomforts. Sleep deprivation and exhaustion are real concerns, especially as they will be rowing non-stop day and night in a 2 hour on 2 hour off shift pattern. Extreme weather conditions and temperatures could hamper their challenge, and then there are other dangers that are less obvious such as passing tankers, whales and sharks – all of which could inflict severe damage or even sink the boat. Because there is no support crew, the men must also deal with any health issues – salt sores, blisters, infections – and boat or equipment failures themselves.

Extreme Conditions

The journey is likely to be fraught with many dangers and discomforts. Sleep deprivation and exhaustion are real concerns, especially as they will be rowing non-stop day and night in a 2 hour on 2 hour off shift pattern. Extreme weather conditions and temperatures could hamper their challenge, and then there are other dangers that are less obvious such as passing tankers, whales and sharks – all of which could inflict severe damage or even sink the boat. Because there is no support crew, the men must also deal with any health issues – salt sores, blisters, infections – and boat or equipment failures themselves.

STORMS
DEHYDRATION
SHARKS
SHIPS
EXHAUSTION
BLISTERS

Crossing the Indian Ocean will be an enormous mental and physical challenge

Crossing the Indian Ocean will be an enormous mental and physical challenge

Weather Systems

Much of their success will be dependent on the weather systems they encounter on route. In 2014 a crew of four, who had intended to make land in Mauritius, found themselves being pushed North by a large weather system and ended up in the Seychelles, adding another 800 miles on their journey. This is a huge worry especially when you only have a limited food supply. The current system that dominates the Indian Ocean should push the boat in the right direction towards Mauritius, and the prevailing winds for that time of year are expected to work in their favour.

Of course, the weather is unpredictable so the team will have a weather router in the UK to keep an eye on things, and assess how it might impact their journey. Their average speed will be in the region of 2-3 knots so they will not be able to navigate any large meteorological event. Having regular updates will ensure they put themselves in the best possible position at the speeds they will be travelling.

Another advantage of having Port Louis as their final destination is that large container and cargo ships pass through regularly. This means that the crew will be able to transport the boat back to the UK saving money on shipping costs, those savings can be passed on to the charities that they are raising funds for.

Weather Systems

Much of their success will be dependent on the weather systems they encounter on route. In 2014 a crew of four, who had intended to make land in Mauritius, found themselves being pushed North by a large weather system and ended up in the Seychelles, adding another 800 miles on their journey. This is a huge worry especially when you only have a limited food supply. The current system that dominates the Indian Ocean should push the boat in the right direction towards Mauritius, and the prevailing winds for that time of year are expected to work in their favour.

Of course, the weather is unpredictable so the team will have a weather router in the UK to keep an eye on things, and assess how it might impact their journey. Their average speed will be in the region of 2-3 knots so they will not be able to navigate any large meteorological event. Having regular updates will ensure they put themselves in the best possible position at the speeds they will be travelling.

Another advantage of having Port Louis as their final destination is that large container and cargo ships pass through regularly. This means that the crew will be able to transport the boat back to the UK saving money on shipping costs, those savings can be passed on to the charities that they are raising funds for.

Why?!

To raise awareness and funds for Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease. The crew want to improve and build the support network for those diagnosed with Parkinson’s at a young age, while promoting the benefits of exercise and healthy living as a way of improving the symptoms associated with Parkinson’s.

Why?!

To raise awareness and funds for Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease. The crew want to improve and build the support network for those diagnosed with Parkinson’s at a young age, while promoting the benefits of exercise and healthy living as a way of improving the symptoms associated with Parkinson’s.

Vo2 max test

Crew member, Robin, was diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease just before his 44th birthday. Robin’s involvement in the row will support vital research into the disease. Oxford Brookes University’s Movement Science Group will closely monitor Robin’s motor skills pre, during and post the row to better understand how his metabolic, cardiovascular and neuro-muscular system cope and adapt to prolonged endurance activity.

Already the study is providing important insights into the condition and could redefine how Parkinson’s is viewed and ultimately treated through new drug therapies and neuro-rehabilitation programmes.

Our crew member, Robin, was diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease just before his 44th birthday. Robin’s involvement in the row will support vital research into the disease. Oxford Brookes University’s Movement Science Group will closely monitor Robin’s motor skills pre, during and post the row to better understand how his metabolic, cardiovascular and neuro-muscular system cope and adapt to prolonged endurance activity.

Already the study is providing important insights into the condition and could redefine how Parkinson’s is viewed and ultimately treated through new drug therapies and neuro-rehabilitation programmes.

As part of the four-man Team ‘Battleborn’ in the Great Pacific Race, Billy and Barry have already inspired thousands who followed their progress through their upbeat blog posts. I know that in the months and years that have followed their successful completion of the World’s Ultimate Endurance Challenge, they have continued to inspire others, not only through their charitable work, but also in their humorous retelling of their encounters with the mighty Pacific Ocean.

They have continually shown good humour, determination and camaraderie which has, and continues to, excite and interest their followers and supporters from around the world. It was an honour to be part of their journey as their crew set not one, but two new Guinness World Records in the Great Pacific Race.

I have no doubt that their unique brand of storytelling will engage audiences all over the world as they take us with them on their challenge to break the world speed record for crossing the Indian Ocean.

CHRIS MARTIN

British explorer

IOR schools project

This is a great opportunity to encourage school children to take up exercise and be inspired by the world around them.

The crew will live-stream to schools around the country so children can chat to them about a whole host of topics including geography, oceanography, meteorology and marine life and conservation.  The boat will also be fitted with a tracker so the children can follow the crew’s progress online.

Help us get to the start line

This challenge has the potential to have a huge, positive impact for those who have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. To get to the starting line, the team are relying on the help of product and financial partners.

The Indian Ocean Row 2018 provides a fantastic opportunity for any organisation to boost its profile and reputation by aligning itself with an incredible cause and an important piece of research by Oxford Brookes University into Parkinson’s.

A world first! For the first time ever on an ocean rowing boat we will be live streaming on YouTube.

It will provide an opportunity for sponsors, friends, family and everyone else to check in with us and see what life is really like on board an ocean rowing boat. The equipment has been supplied by Marine Camera Solutions.

#IOR18

Together we can achieve more, join us on our journey!